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Dx Allergic Conjunctivitis Treatment: Read More...


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SUMMARY:
The symptomatic treatment of allergic conjunctivitis relies on treating the allergy with oral over-the-counter antihistamines and in severe cases, prescription anti-histamine eye drops and/or oral mast cell stabilizers.
Many treatments are inexpensive. Over-the-counter oral Benadryl® and Periactin®; prescription oral carbinoxamine; prescription eye drops of fluorometholone, Crolom®, and with mixed infection, gentamycin opthalmic.

The Cochrane Database Review goes so far as to state that "The majority of cases in bacterial conjunctivitis are self-limiting and no treatment is necessary in uncomplicated cases. However, conjunctivitis caused by gonorrhea or chlamydia and conjunctivitis in contact lens wearers should be treated with antibiotics. Treatment for viral conjunctivitis is supportive. Treatment with antihistamines and mast cell stabilizers alleviates the symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis."


Allergic Conjunctivitis

The Merck Manual Home Edition states:
"Allergic conjunctivitis is inflammation of the conjunctiva caused by an allergic reaction.
  Allergic reactions caused by, for example, airborne allergens, may inflame the conjunctiva. Redness, irritation, swelling, and discharge are common.Various eye drops may help decrease inflammation.
  The conjunctiva (the membrane that lines the eyelid and covers the white of the eye) contains a large number of cells from the immune system (mast cells) that release chemical substances (mediators) in response to a variety of stimuli (such as pollens or dust mites).
  These mediators cause inflammation in the eyes, which may be brief or long-lasting. About 20% of people have some degree of allergic conjunctivitis.

Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis and perennial allergic conjunctivitis are the most common types of allergic reaction in the eyes. Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis is often caused by mold spores or tree, weed, or grass pollens, leading to its typical appearance in the spring and early summer. Weed pollens are responsible for symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis in the summer and early fall. Perennial allergic conjunctivitis occurs year-round and is most often caused by dust mites, animal dander, and feathers."

Medications Used in Treatment:
1. Corticosteroids: prednisone, medrol®, Omnipred®, etc.
2. NSAIDs: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: Voltaren®/ Acular®
3. Antihistamines: Promethegan®, Phenadoz®, Optivar®, etc.

*[Editor]: No treatment necessary? The most recent review in JAMA 2013 states "The majority of cases in bacterial conjunctivitis are self-limiting and no treatment is necessary in uncomplicated cases. However, conjunctivitis caused by gonorrhea or chlamydia and conjunctivitis in contact lens wearers should be treated with antibiotics. Treatment for viral conjunctivitis is supportive. Treatment with antihistamines and mast cell stabilizers alleviates the symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis."

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