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dx Atrial Fibrillation: read more


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SUMMARY: With atrial fibrillation, the blood stagnates in the atrium of the heart and can form a large clot. If the clot breaks off, it can travel to the arteries of the brain and cause a stroke.

For prevention, patients with atrial fibrillation are placed first on a heart rate limiting drugs such as beta blockers and calcium channel blockers. Next, anticoagulant medications such as warfarin are added. Warfarin is inexpensive but requires weekly blood tests (INR) to finely tune the dosage of medication. Digitalis is added for heart failure.

An unrecognized, inexpensive combination of metformin and stanozolol, would avoid the need for weekly blood tests or anticoagulants.
Observation:
Atrial Fibrillation:

The Merck Manual Home Edition
states:
"Atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter are very fast electrical discharge patterns that make the atria contract very rapidly, with some of the electrical impulses reaching the ventricles and causing them to contract irregularly, faster, and less efficiently than normal.

*These disorders often result from conditions that cause the atria to enlarge.
*Symptoms depend on how fast the ventricles contract and may include palpitations, weakness, dizziness or light-headedness, shortness of breath, and chest pain.
*Electrocardiography (ECG) confirms the diagnosis.

Treatment includes drugs to slow the ventricles' contractions and sometimes drugs or electrical shocks (cardioversion) to restore normal heart rhythm.

Atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter are more common among older people and people who have a heart disorder. Atrial fibrillation is much more common than atrial flutter. Many people with atrial flutter also have episodes of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter may come and go or be sustained.

Atrial fibrillation:
During atrial fibrillation, electrical impulses are triggered from many areas in and around the atria rather than just one area (the sinoatrial node). The resulting electrical activity is chaotic rather than organized and thus, the atrial walls quiver rather than contract. Because the atria do not contract normally, they do not help pump blood into the ventricles. When the atria do not help pump blood to the ventricles, the heart puts out about 10% less blood. This slightly lower output is usually not a problem except in people who have heart disease, particularly when they exert themselves."

*[Editor] Every man over the age of 45 and woman over the age of 60 should have a Coronary Artery Calcium Score (C.A.C.S.). This is a 30-second rapid C.T. scan of the chest that documents the presence, size, and volume of calcification. If he/she has calcification strongly predicted future major adverse cardiac events." On the positive side, having a score of zero or even a C.A.C.S. score less than 100, says the John Hopkin's group: low or zero C.A.C.S. "will find that individual is at virtually no risk of having a heart attack and "for older individuals without calcium in their arteries, it means they do not need routinely prescribed cholesterol lowering medications... because they are at a lower risk of a hear attack."

Medications Used in the Treatment:
1. Beta Blockers: propranolol
2. Calcium Channel Blockers: Calan®
3. Anticoagulants: Coumadin®, jantoven, Pradaxa®, etc.
4. Antiarrhythmics: Tambocor®, Rythmol®, Multag®, etc.
5. Cardiac Glycosides: Lanoxin®
6. Anabolic Anticoagulant Formulary: testosterone
7. Adrenal hormones: DHEA and hydrocortisone

*[Editor] Antedotally, patients have reported reduction of atrial fibrillation with the use of ox bile (40% UCDA over-the-counter). UCDA is available as prescription Actigall©. This product must effective liver production of the cholic acid and UCDA. The reversal of the normal relationship of 40% cholic acid and 60% UCDA is associated with gallstone formation.
*Basic biochemistry shows that addition of biliary acids cause an " An inversion of the effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline on the rat heart was observed" by "simultaneous decreased stimulation of beta-receptors."

*Interestingly, addition of UCDA improves gastric motility as well as biliary mobility with a P factor of >.001. **** *[Editor] Advanced programs for Atrial Fibrillation recognize that the site for the abnormal electric foci is most often (90%) in the pulmonary vein not the heart. Certain centers are electing to cauterize these pulmonary foci  and complications have been noted.

Natural therapies include increased dosages of ascorbic acid reduce the incidence of post-ablation atrial fibrillation from 26% to 4%. Pre-loading with ascorbic acid intravenously may use the Myer's protocol . Secondarily, cortisol replacement has been used to prevent post-op AF protocol. Some success in individuals has been reported using the hydrocortisone replacement protocol per Hertoghe: 10mg of hydrocortisone upon arising, repeated after breakfast, 5mg at noon with the optional 2.5mg as late as 4:00PM.

*[Editor] An interesting article documents case reports of individual men who were able to avoid recurrent atrial fibrillation by raising their serum testosterone levels. The high risk of an intra-atrial blood clot and the risk of cerebral vascular clot/stroke is the reason for prescribing anti-clotting medications such as warfarin. A forgotten hematologic regimen of anticoagulant medications such as warfarin are added. Warfarin is inexpensive but requires weekly blood tests (INR) to finely tune the dosage of medication. Digitalis is added for heart failure.


*<[Editor] The Cochrane Database "To assess (1) the comparative efficacy of long-term anticoagulation using DTIs(Prdaxa) versus VKAs(Wararin) on vascular deaths and ischaemic events in people with non-valvular AF, and (2) the comparative safety of chronic anticoagulation using DTIs versus VKAs on (a) fatal and non-fatal major bleeding events including haemorrhagic strokes, (b) adverse events other than bleeding and ischaemic events that lead to treatment discontinuation and (c) all-cause mortality in people with non-valvular AF FOUND THAT "To assess (1) the comparative efficacy of long-term anti-coagulation using DTIs versus VKAs on vascular deaths and ischemic events in people with non-valvular AF, and (2) the comparative safety of chronic anti-coagulation using DTIs versus VKAs on (a) fatal and non-fatal major bleeding events including haemorrhagic strokes, (b) adverse events other than bleeding and ischaemic events that lead to treatment discontinuation and (c) all-cause mortality in people with non-valvular AF." Therefore, although there were less major bleeding events and less hemorrhagic strokes of DTI, there was no difference in death rate [because DTIs were associated with more myocardial infarctions]. *[Editor] An unrecognized, inexpensive combination of metformin and stanozolol, Metformin and Stanozolol may offer potentially a safer medication combination by reducing platelet aggregation (PAI-1). This was reported in both the hematologic literature and British Medical Journal in 1977. Both researchers used the oral stanozolol and metformin. The Editor has successfully used these two medications, (after consultation with the chairperson of hematology at the university medical school) in addition to testosterone (injections and pellets in an obese diabetic man with hospital-confirmed pulmonary emboli who could not be stabilized with warfarin, heparin or other agents. The medication reduced his PAI-1 (platelet aggregation inhibition-1 marker). The patient completely recovered and was symptom free after 6-months of therapy. This was five years ago. He has continued his anabolic therapy and metformin.

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